Tag Archives: self service machines

Week Fourteen Already?!

I’m (un)officially past my thirteen-week probation period, so they can’t chuck me out now! I say “unofficially” because I haven’t yet had the thirteen-week review, but I’m pretty sure I haven’t done anything so terribly awful that I’d be asked to leave.

Here’s what I’ve been up to recently:

My big project in the last couple of weeks has been sorting out withdrawn books. These are books that aren’t in the library any more, usually because they’re too old and out of date, but which still show up in the system. I’ve had a couple of enormous print-outs of spreadsheets (the current one has about 2500 items on it) to look at, and I’ve had to check the shelves to make sure that none of the books are still in the library when they shouldn’t be, and then removing them properly from the system. It’s not particularly difficult, but it is time-consuming! I’ve got through all the One Week Loan books and I’m almost done with the 2500 Reference books that don’t exist, and then it’ll be time for Lending copies. That one will take the longest, as that is the type of book that we have most of, but hopefully I’ll be able to get one of my colleagues to help out on that.

I also finished writing my instruction manual for digitisation. I spent a while doing these as I wanted them to be as clear and helpful as possible, and I got one of the Senior Library Assistants to test it out so I could make changes. I was really pleased to see it in use and I only had to add a couple of things before it was finished. I got some great feedback about it as well – it is something to put on my CV, apparently! I’m hoping this will be the start of a long and happy career showing people how to do things. On that subject, I’ve also started creating a new podcast which will show students how to use their NHS Athens accounts and the NHS resources available to them. This podcast is radically different from the last one I did, and neither of them is particularly bog-standard, but it’s the sort of challenge I enjoy and it certainly seems to be becoming one of my strong points.

I also worked with another spreadsheet last week – all the books that we digitised are supposed to be stamped with a stamp so we know not to get rid of them (which would be against CLA rules). However, most of the books have more than one copy, so we compiled a spreadsheet of all the copies of books that have had chapters digitised, and then hunted them down to stamp them and cross them off the list. Lots of the books are out on loan, so we had to go onto the system to put messages on for them to be stamped when they’re returned. It’s been quite successful so far, and we’ve managed to cross off almost all the books on the list, although we’ll still be doing this in the spring as some of the books are on long loan.

Last week was also fairly dramatic in a few ways – on Thursday the system went down first thing in the morning so none of the computers could issue or discharge books, and the self-service machines were also out of action. We almost had to resort to paper for the day, but luckily everything came back online about 5 minutes after we opened the doors to students.

On Friday it was deadline day for a large number of our students, so we were very busy all afternoon and the printers kept running out of paper and ink. The staplers couldn’t handle the pressure and gave up the ghost too, which was an added stress factor. Most of the students managed to sort themselves out in good time, but a couple of them left things until the last minute and we had to literally chase them out of the darkened building at closing time. That definitely didn’t help any of our blood pressures!

We’ve also had a number of “ghostly” goings-on this week. You may remember I’ve mentioned the ghosts before; apparently this building is haunted, although I’ve only just found out the story behind all this. The college was requisitioned by the government during the war and turned into a hospital, and the story goes that the ghosts of children can be heard running through the corridors and giggling. The other morning one of the security guards rushed into the library and said he’d heard a child scream, but there wasn’t anyone else in the building yet. This prompted a whole day of ghost stories and the attribution of recent weird happenings to “the ghosts”. The books upstairs keep getting pushed to the backs of the shelves when we’re not looking, and the display table for new books gets mysteriously rearranged every so often. Some of the library staff are convinced it’s the ghost children, as it’s the sort of mischievous thing kids would do, although there are a couple of flaws to this – a lot of the shelves are too high for children to reach, for a start. There’s also the minor ghosts-don’t-exist thing. It’s probably just bored students, although it’s a bit of a strange hobby.

To round off this post, here are a couple of things that made me laugh this week: first, a funny thing someone said to me the other day at a party. I’d just told her what I do and she said “oh, that sounds so PEACEFUL. How LOVELY.” (yes, in that exact voice) I thought, if only you knew the truth…! Yes, the library might not be full of students with enquiries all the time, but we’re always busy behind the scenes! Secondly, I noticed that someone found my blog by Googling “MMU Graduate Trainee Salary”.  I hope they weren’t expecting to find me blogging about my champagne-drinking lifestyle. It’s strictly fizzy water on a GT salary!

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Looking to the Future

On Wednesday I went to the University of Sheffield’s Postgraduate Open Day to see the place I’d applied to and get a feel for the course. Of course, as with all open days I’ve ever been to, the weather was atrocious, but I think this can be a good thing – after all, if you like the place when it’s grey and miserable, you’ll definitely like it when it’s sunny and warm. I’d never been to Sheffield before but I liked what little I saw of it.

My first stop was to the main exhibition, where they had stands from all sorts of University services. I picked up a ton of leaflets and three pens, so it was quite a success. There was also supposed to be a welcome talk, but I couldn’t find that. No matter though, as I was straight off to the Information Commons for a tour. The IC is Sheffield’s main library, and it’s very shiny and exciting. It’s quite similar to the All Saints library here at MMU, what with its 24-hour opening and self-service issue, returns and reservations. However, there are some parts of it that are quite exciting and different, including the “flexispace” where all the furniture is on wheels so you can design your own group study space, and the private study rooms with whiteboard walls. I can see why they were top of the table for university libraries in 2011.

Sheffield University Information Commons http://www.flickr.com/photos/paolomargari/786017449/

Afterwards, I wandered down towards my next appointment, stopping off at a University café for some beef goulash which was very tasty and affordable. Another point to Sheffield! I then attended a talk which was not really what was advertised (or maybe I just got the wrong end of the stick) – it was sort of a “why should you do postgraduate taught study” session aimed at people who hadn’t made up their minds yet, rather than a session for people who knew what they were doing and wanted some more specific information. The speaker, an Economics lecturer, was engaging though, so it was still a fairly interesting half-hour, even if I didn’t learn anything new (perhaps this just means I’ve done good research already though!).

I then looked around another of Sheffield’s libraries, the St George’s Library, which the librarians at the main exhibition had said was the subject library for library and information students. I don’t think it is any more, but it was still interesting to get a look at a different library. This one was a lot smaller, and felt more like Elizabeth Gaskell Library. It was nice, although not nearly as shiny and exciting as the Information Commons!

After this, it was time to go to the Information School for a meeting with a senior lecturer. I was instantly impressed with the iSchool because they’d laid on Party Rings for us – that’s the best biscuit I’ve ever been given by a university. These are the things that matter. There were two other people there who were looking at the MA Librarianship, although I didn’t chat much with them as we were met by Sheila Webber, the senior lecturer, quite quickly. She took us to her office and gave us an overview of the course and the different modules, and the sorts of opportunities we would get. There’s something called Essential Computing Skills which sounds like it’ll be great on my CV, as well as some really interesting modules to choose from in the second semester. There was also a handy part of her presentation which set out what they were looking for from potential students – most useful what with the interview I was going to the next day!

After visiting the iSchool and being thoroughly impressed with it and the course, I left, to go and prepare myself for the interview the next day. I applied to the course at Sheffield a couple of weeks ago and got an invite to an interview with them about three days later – not bad going at all. I had a bit of a look on Google to see if anyone had written about their Sheffield interview experience, and lo and behold, a few people had, because if there is any group of people that likes to write about things and post it on the internet, it’s librarians. Librarians have got self-reflection down to a T, and it’s really useful for times like this. Everyone seemed to say that the interview was quite relaxed and informal, so I wasn’t too nervous going in, although I had to stop myself from getting too complacent – I still had to prove my worth!

The interview was with Sheila Webber, who I’d met (and questioned rather a lot) the day before, so I was instantly at ease. We talked about why I wanted to come to Sheffield, and why I wanted to study on the course. These were questions I was prepared for, so that was ok. Then we got on to the future of librarianship and I’d handily been following some stuff on Twitter the night before about how Croydon Council has put the library service out to tender, so I could speak a bit about my thoughts on the financial situation, and the public (and political) opinions on what libraries are for and how they should be run. It was all very easy and comfortable, and I asked some questions about some of the modules and dissertations, and then Sheila said “well, we’ll definitely be offering you a place” and I was so happy I sort of got stuck and said thank you about 50 times. And then after I left and went to get the tram back to the train station, this happened:

So that was good.

Anyway, I’m going to Sheffield! As long as I can get some money together to pay for it, of course.  I’m going to send off the AHRC funding application this week and keep all my fingers crossed that they’ll like me enough to give me lots of money. Back up plans at the ready!

 

 

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Postcards from a soggy island

Hypothesis: people eat more when it rains. No, seriously. The queue in Tesco yesterday when I came out of work filled up half the shop. I impulse-bought a box of Magnum lollies, probably to make it feel a bit less wintry and miserable. The rain has been crazy these past couple of days – it hasn’t stopped raining for almost 48 hours now. That’s a bit ridiculous. There are dead umbrellas littering the pavements outside work – it’s as if nobody was quite prepared for this much bad weather. It’s not been good news at work either – because the library is in such an old building, it is prone to leaks, and we’ve had to get some buckets out recently to catch the worst of it. Thankfully the books are unscathed!
Since the students came back the library has completely changed in atmosphere. The enquiry desk has been practically mobbed every day, and the issue desk is often too much for one or even two of us to handle. We’re hoping it’ll all calm down when the students learn to use the self-service machines, and when they learn that the books are all upstairs and no, I can’t tell you whether the dementia books are next to the nursing books because that’s not really how the system works. My favourite is probably the ones who ask whether we sell the books or just loan them out – if we sold them we wouldn’t have any on the shelves!

I’ve been fairly busy in the last week – new books are coming in at a rate of knots and it’s my responsibility to get them onto the system. This went a bit wrong today when it transpired that I’m a bit faster at doing this than perhaps Library Support Services would like – after I check the books in, I have to send off the invoices to LSS for them to confirm them and let them be seen as available on the catalogue. However, people have been trying to take books out today that haven’t been processed by LSS yet – oops. At least that was a learning exercise – don’t put books on the shelves until they’re on the catalogue!

I’ve also been keeping track of digitisations and putting them on reading lists for units. This is quite a mammoth task, it turns out; one lecturer has supplied a list of about 30 digitisations that she wants for one unit, and each of them takes at least an hour to process (providing we don’t have to get an inter-library loan of the document in question). I’ve also got to make sure all the details are up to date on the spreadsheet where we record what’s going on to show the Copyright Licensing Agency. Suffice it to say I’ve done a lot of going back and forth checking emails and request forms, hoping everything matches up. Bit of a nightmare!

Last Wednesday I did my first late shift, which was quite nice. It was definitely good to have a lie in in the morning! I managed to put some laundry on and go to the Post Office, and it was really useful to have some free daytime hours to get stuff done. This week I’m planning to go to the gym during my morning off, as long as the weather’s not too terrible. The actual late shift itself was quite uneventful – we had about two people in after 5pm, both of whom left around 7.30, leaving us with not much to do apart from crosswords and sudoku for another hour and a half. It made quite a change from the daytime shift!

There’s not much else to report – it’s been business as usual mostly. I am absolutely starving though as the biscuit supply seems to have dried up at work, so I’m off to sort out some dinner.

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